Anger & The Spectacle: Collaborative Growth

Season 2, Episode 1

by Ashia R.
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Episode Transcript

Bellamy
[Laughing]

Ashia Ray
Perfect. Okay.

Bellamy
Oh, your voice is coming from a different place. [laughter]

Ashia Ray
It’s okay, Bellamy and I are trying to figure out some technology. It’s it’s… enjoy us being terrible at it. Okay, ready, set, awesomeness! We’re gonna do season two, episode one, the spring edition of the Raising luminaries podcast with Revolutionary Humans. And that’s a very fancy way of saying, me – Ashia, goofing around with Bellamy and pretending we have anything important to say.

Bellamy
That’s right. [laughter]

Ashia Ray
Okay. So today we’re talking about, oh, very important topics that we had pre planned ahead of time. I just happen to not have them with me. So in coordination if you’re unfamiliar with either one of us: Revolutionary Humans creates art projects, and essays, and paintings and Bellamy, you all tell me all the other amazing things to help you raise revolutionary humans. And similarly, Raising Luminaries creates resources to help parents and educators ignite the next generation of kind and courageous humans to smash the kyriarchy. So like the same thing? Right?

Bellamy
Right. Yeah, basically, same, same angle.

Ashia Ray
And I guess the difference is, I make a lot of words, too many words. And Bellamy makes art.

Bellamy
Pretty things. [laughter]

Ashia Ray
So we’re focusing on spring. So let’s go over quickly without having to explain too much that makes you uncomfortable. What’s going on with you? What happened last year? And what are you what’s changing?

Bellamy
Oh, what’s changing? Everything is changing? I think? I went through, I guess last year was maybe technically the second half of the pandemic or the, the middle, the middle portion of the pandemic. So I went through all that as a single parent all the time. And I struggled to hold everything together. And so I decided we needed to move. And so we moved to share space with a friend in Arkansas. And that was weird. And then we needed to move again.

Bellamy
So we are now in a new place in North Carolina. And it has been… so now I am sort of like relearning myself and relearning what I’m interested in, what I’m passionate about. Rrying to decide what I want to do next. Which is, it’s just a lot. Like it’s just a lot. It’s just a lot. I dropped us right back down into a place where we used to live. I’m having to also reconcile with my past a bit. And so this is definitely like spring, I feel really good about attempts to like, grow and start fresh. Feels really nice.

Ashia Ray
Awesome. Okay, so you’re in a new apartment with the kids. And now supposedly, even though you have them 24 hours a day, and they are silly, supposedly got to figure out how to support our people now that things are changing dramatically.

Ashia Ray
Like, I know that for a lot of our people with disabilities and their kids under five, they don’t have vaccinations available, and they’re still living like deep in the pandemic, and it’s still terrifying. But for a lot of people, they’re like, “Oh, let’s just go about business as normal. Except we’ve got like this mediocre white man in charge, so things will be okay. And we don’t have to try that hard.”

Ashia Ray
So what does it look like? What is it going to look like to support our people and raise…? Well, part of it is scary because it seems like a lot less people are concerned about raising children who lead a revolution. But for the people who are still here, and they still see that there’s there are things that are deeply, deeply wrong and need support on. What are some ideas that you have for moving forward with giving our community what they need so they can raise awesome kids to destroy injustice. And great things. And brush their teeth – brush thier teeth alone!

Bellamy
Brush their teeth. [laughter] Yeah, I think makes a good point. Because the urgency is not there, the urgency is not where it was last year or, you know, while Trump was in office, and so we are contending with a different sort of work and every everyone has changed, and everyone is different, and people have less time in some ways and less capacity.

Bellamy
And I know like, personally, just survival was my goal. And so it was really hard to think too far out of like, my immediate, our immediate needs and what had to happen. And so I think, I don’t know what the answers are to what we can do next, or what we should do next. I do think… like one of the things that I like about writing personal essays is that they are, can be relatively short, or like maybe, you know, five or 10 minute read. And then the idea from the essay is that the person reading will see themselves in front of it or recognize a need and part of it or see some way that they can help someone else or better recognize where they fit in change making.

Bellamy
So part of me thinks that essays are still a good place to be, if people still read, because they’re just they’re just fast, fast and effective. But other than that, I just don’t know, I feel like we were talking before about being respectful of people’s time. And being impactful, but not not taking up too much time. Because it just seems like time is is at a premium right now. Maybe more so than ever, especially with parents who are still living in the strictest terms of the pandemic. So my answer to that is – I don’t know. What do you think?

Ashia Ray
[laughter] But we break it down, you break it down very nicely. Yeah. So I think central to me is always respectful of people’s time. And knowing that the people who need the help the most do not have the capacity to sit there and watch like a 12 hour webinar. Nor do they have the resources to like go out and buy kits or pay for classes and stuff like that. Nevermind to like, bring it in, synthesize it, and then discuss it with their kids. So I think essays are really, like they’re a strong point for you, especially with like your ebook. ‘This is Unsustainable,’ had a lot of really, really good essays.

Ashia Ray
It was so quick to read. I did it in like one 45-minute session on an exercise bike.

Bellamy
Oh, nice!

Ashia Ray
But then you can go through in each essay takes so such a short time to read. But then it’s like a like a month’s worth of pondering and thinking about. Which is great. So like, maximum, like, great return on my time investment. Right? And I will say, well, they are quick to read. They’re like really, like, you know, I write articles too, time consuming and exhausting to write Right? Because like essay, I don’t know, for you, but each post or essay for me takes about 14 hours.

Ashia Ray
So most of that is info dumping, getting like 50 pages, and then cutting it down to a reasonable amount of text for people to… I’m like, Okay, how can I explain the complexity of the universe in like, 250 words.

Bellamy
[laughter]

Ashia Ray
So, I think it’s really important that we keep in mind, being respectful of people’s time, takes a lot of energy, and a lot of time, right. But it’s kind of central to what we do.

Ashia Ray
And then the other thing that you were doing was paintings, which are gorgeous, and and then artwork. I’ve heard from so many people who say the the activities that you do, like cut out activities, collage activities, there’s a lot of stuff that looks like you need a printer, but you could actually do just by looking at the exercise, right?

Ashia Ray
So I can’t get my kids to sit still long enough to do that. But I’ve heard from so many people that that they’re like, ‘Wow,’ I’ve heard from people who like, run art galleries and museums, and they’re like art teachers – and they’re like ‘It didn’t occur to me to do it this way. And it’s really resonating with my kids.’ So…

Bellamy
Aww that’s so sweet.

Ashia Ray
Right? Because whenever I ask people – ‘What are the resources you using?’ And they say, yours. Right? They’re saying Revolutionary Humans. As their one-stop shop is visiting our two sites. Which is awesome.

Bellamy
Yeah, that’s great.

Ashia Ray
So they go….and so those projects are helpful. And what’s nice is they’re kind of an inspiration. So people can make up their own stuff. But the other side of respecting people’s, time making it accessible, making sure that it actually resonates. It’s not just busy work, like, it’s not just one more kit, like a subscription kit to do with your kid, just to say that you did it or to feel like a good parent – is that it has to be within our capacity.

Ashia Ray
Because as people who live at, you know, the lower half of what this system is designed to support – a system that’s not designed to make things accessible or easy, or supportive for parents like us. I think part of it is – the survival is resistance and trying to do what’s actually in our capacity to do, without overextending ourselves.

Ashia Ray
And we’re very different people. And you have I would say, like, if we’re going to have an oppression Olympics, you win.

Bellamy
[laughter] Thank you, thank you.

Ashia Ray
Contratulations (/sarcasm). There’s like, there’s a certain I just have to say – there’s a certain subset of like very privileged people who are like, “Oh, I wish I was like…” I’m just like, “No, oh, mygod.” So I will say, but even as speaking from my own experience, as you know, I’m an Asian person. I am Autistic, and I have an invisible disability, which means I’ve always taken on the role of like, the model minority who’s kind of quirky. So like, I’m the Asian that you collect, like, I’m Claudia from the Baby Sitters Club. [laughter]

Ashia Ray
Like, sometimes I get to monologue, one of the books, but like, I’m clearly not one of the people who push the plot along. And I’m trying really hard now that I’m being a role model, not just for my kids, but other Asian, like kids and particularly other autistic people of color, trying not to play the sidekick role anymore. Because my, the way that I was raised, my role is that I’m used to just picking up without even thinking about it. Is just to volunteer and be the sidekick. And say like, “What do you need? What does support look like?” And then show up and do the support.

Ashia Ray
Actually, there was a an old TV show with like a white guy who does Kung Fu and he’s got like a sidekick who’s Chinese – that’s one of my cousins.

Bellamy
My God. Oh, my God. [laughter]

Ashia Ray
Like, we have a long ancestral history – but anyway. So that’s just like the way we were raised right? Don’t make waves, you know, work your way up through, take advantage of that model minority myth that actually pushes down Black people. It but it’s still – it still just benefits white folks. And it still just benefits allistic folks to be like the speaking, intelligent, or – not intelligent, but you know, like speaking, knowledgeable, autistic.

Ashia Ray
So I’m trying to think of what does that look like? If we plot what we’re doing now from a scale of toxic to regenerative, where it’s like, it goes from toxic, which is actively hurting us and hurting society, to untenable, which is it’s hurting us. For the most part, society is not really impacted. To sustainable, where like society is okay – but we are personally running at full maximum speed. To regenerative – we’re helping society, we can survive and we can keep up this pace and grow and lift up all the people who are like us.

Ashia Ray
So I’ve been thinking a lot about that this year. What is my work look like? If I move the needle away from… untenable and toxic? A lot of my life I’ve been nudging it into untenable. And now what does it look like to move towards sustainability? And oh my gosh, could you even imagine like regenerative where like, I actually get paid enough just to like, not have a panic attack every time… like buying lunch outside? Or like, or like…

Bellamy
[laughter] Outside lunch?! What is that!

Ashia Ray
Yeah. Like when I think about whether or not to sell [unintelligible], but no, I still have to think of like, ‘Man, I wish I was one of those people could just like… order lunch,’ right? Because a lot of my job is to provide and provide and provide and be like, ‘Hey, guys, could you pay me? If you want to? Maybe it’d be nice…” Because I do want to make a lot of my work free and accessible. And that paywall doesn’t hurt rich people, it hurts the people who can’t afford it.

Ashia Ray
So how do we set those boundaries while also doing the same stuff that we were doing, which is helping parents raise kind and courageous humans and, and maybe connect with people who otherwise were a little bit on the fence or didn’t realize that they had to pay attention to these things. While also not, not like… Joy Luck Clubbing ourselves, we’re like ripping our own arms open and bleeding into soup to take care of someone else like. So, with that long diatribe, what does regenerative work look like for you? You’re helping society and you’re helping yourself if you had… like, what does support look like for you? So you could do that work?

Bellamy
Hmm. I mean, I think my ideal situation would be to be able to create art, and suggestions for mindful social equity focused art projects and things like that. And keep, like continuing to do what I’m doing. And also be able to pay my bills, without feeling like I have to sensationalize my work or beg, beg for cash, or capitalize on specific, like deaths in the media or, you know, murders in the media rather. And just to be able to do the work. That seems like it’s good work. And it seems like people appreciate it. And I feel like one thing that tends to be missing is the sharing – sharing of the work.

Bellamy
I think word of mouth would make a huge difference, I think, when somebody uses a resource, and if it’s a free resource, especially on my website, and then share it – share with your friends and say, “Hey,” like, “Check this out, have you seen this?” I think that that would be really impactful.

Bellamy
I mean, I like the work that I’m doing, I get stalled, and I’m not able to produce as much work as I’d like to, because I’m constantly worried that it won’t pay enough and that I need to pivot and do something else. And so I end up standing in my own way of doing the things that do work, because I just am like, ‘Well, I can’t – I cannot feed my children with this”. And I am the only one here to feed them. And so it just adds this extra pressure.

Bellamy
But I think – not being a sidekick, not sensationalizing, not saying or doing things just to get likes – I think all of those things are, are things that you and I are both working on and trying to figure out. How do we do this work that’s important and good work in a way that doesn’t…. I don’t want to say marginalize, but there’s a word that I can’t remember, but just in a way that that doesn’t, oh, maybe like capitalize on these things that we’d like to move past and move away from.

Bellamy
I think it’s challenging. Because I’ve had businesses where I just, I plan kids birthday parties, or I took pictures, or I used to make diaper cakes, which was weird. And, there was no pressure, there was no pressure to be or do anything other than what we were doing. And nobody was like waiting for a black kid to get killed on the street to buy a diaper cake. But now it’s so much of what we’re doing is is hung up on people paying attention, and people don’t pay attention unless less something radical and horrible happens.

Ashia Ray
Yeah, and I think – there was like this influx every time there’s, every time there is violence against a person of color. Less so when there’s violence against a disabled person – but like, every time there’s a murder, or some sort of torturous horrible… I feel like there’s an element of being the spectacle, like, it’s almost … we’re almost entertainment, like watching a horror movie, right? Like, people murder a whole bunch of Asian women and it’s like, “Oh, gosh!” And they’re almost paying attention because it makes them feel good to pay attention and also not doing anything.

Ashia Ray
So my partner was talking about these studies where people drive, they’re on the highway and they pass by someone broken down on the side of the highway. And they look at it, and they think, “Oh, I should stop…. but oh, I was going too fast, it’s too late.” And then instead of coming away with a policy on what they’re going to do next time, they come away being like, “I’m such a good person for considering that.”

Ashia Ray
[laughter] Like wow. Okay.

Bellamy
[laughter] That’s a really good metaphor. Yeah

Ashia Ray
How’ya gonna work with that? And I feel that too, like, I create these resources on how to talk to your kids. And then once you’ve talked to your kids, how to take the next step, and the next step, so it’s a little bit easier and easier. So that way, you’re actually writing letters and you’re donating money. And you’re not just throwing money at the problem, you’re investing yourself deeper with every step. But – I’m not sure how much of this is getting past clicking the post and sharing it to so it looks like they’re paying attention and doing something. But not actually starting with that very, very easy ask, which is – get the book and read it to your kid and have a discussion.

Ashia Ray
Because I promise, all of it gets so much easier after that. But I create these resources, and I’m like why aren’t people paying attention to this? And then a tragedy happens, some violence has happened to us. And suddenly, people are sharing all over the place getting clicks and shares, and you know, a few people donating to pay for this resource. But I don’t want money to come in, because a black man has been shot, right? I don’t want something to come in because we’ve elected a sexual predator into the Supreme Court Justice, like, I don’t want that to be my success. It shouldn’t be hinged on someone else’s pain. But something about trying to prevent that pain connects the two, and I’m not comfortable with it. There’s got to be a better way to do this. So another thing? Yeah, like, you want to be like, ‘Yay, we just got twice as many followers as before.’ But then you can’t, because you’re like, “This is horrible. I don’t want these, I would give up everything for this one person to still be alive.’ Right. It’s horrible.

Bellamy
But also that, not to interrupt you, but that I think of the difference between what we do and what we want, and what many other people do. I think there are many, many activists, that it never crosses their mind that their work, their work should not exist, or these large donations that they get, should not exist, because no one should be dying in this manner. And I think the ability and sort of the… I don’t want to say like self sacrifice, but like… maybe the self awareness to say like, ‘I’d rather not have to do any of this.’ And have less violence, or less people dying due to these horrific actions or, you know, maybe to not have a sexual predator and in the Supreme Court. I’d rather none of this be needed. I think that that notion and developing that notion could be the answer to how we progress without without having people just show up when something terrible happens.

Ashia Ray
Yeah, this actually ties into one of the themes we talked about in March for Raising Luminaries, for the roundups that I make. Anger, usually my first thought is – there’s there’s almost like a personal guilt over getting a byproduct of success or something in popularity when something terrible happens, or when something terrible is done to another person. And I can even feel it right now. It’s the biggest emotion that follows right after this is not just confusion, but anger.

Ashia Ray
I just get very angry. And I can’t show that anger because I’m supposed to be grateful that people are listening, finally. But I just get angry because I’m like, if six months ago, you had done this, this wouldn’t have happened. If six months ago you had opened this post shared it with your people, normalize that this is not okay. If two years ago you had done this, this wouldn’t be a conversation. If 10 years ago you had done this, we would be in a completely different place. Those (murdered) kids would be going to college.

Ashia Ray
So it’s just like – when I get over the overwhelm and the confusion, I just get really fucking angry because people aren’t sharing my posts about “Wake the fuck up and talk to your kids about about school shootings before it happens in your school.” “Start talking about anti black racism before – particularly for my Asian family and community, start talking about anti black racism and how we’re complicit in it before there’s violence between the two of us again, continuously.

Ashia Ray
Because now – there’s actually violence between us right now, and it’s ramping up, and no one is talking about it, because they’re like, “Oh, we can’t talk about that.. because how do we be anti racist if we’re pointing out that individual people of color are hurting each other?”

Ashia Ray
You know, I get so many of those comments on my website. They’re like, “What about black on black violence?”

Ashia Ray
Like, shut up? What ABOUT it? Fuck. Just shut the fuck up.

Bellamy
[laughter]

Ashia Ray
Like what about toddler on toddler violence? Irrelevant! Derailing!

Ashia Ray
But then also that spectacle, what you said, to get our work out there and to get people to pay attention, there’s this requirement of sensationalizing and making people outraged. So when I have that anger, my preferred go to – to channel that anger into good trouble is to just rant and be like, “What the fuck are you thinking?” Just making those articles in those essays.

Ashia Ray
However, they don’t have the intent I want. People don’t read that and feel like “Oh, yeah, I really should have done something.” Instead, they go like, “Yeah, love this. This is great. You go girl!”

Ashia Ray
Like – Don’t fucking… do not confuse my valid human, frustration, anger and pain, for something that I’ve designed to, entertain you or make you feel like, like a girl boss or whatever.

Ashia Ray
[laughter] hastag girlboss

Ashia Ray
It’s not even just that it’s not safe to be angry. Even in the channels where we are allowed to be angry, or where it’s like, somewhat profitable to be angry, it still becomes a spectacle, and it still becomes like, “Look at that an Angry Asian person!” or like “An angry autistic?!” Right? We’re supposed to be so nice and gentle or like, or school shooters. Whatever, you know, like we have those exceptionalism/children dynamic – what is it called? They equate us to being like young children, as opposed to adults who just think. And like, What the fuck! You can’t break out of that. Because even if you try and nudge into away from that stereotype, they’ll just boom, you over to the other side of that scale.

Ashia Ray
There’s just, it’s really hard to crack open those skulls and be like, ‘No, we’re actually people and we’re hurting. And we’re trying to give you the support you need.’

Ashia Ray
How many times do we say like, ‘believe people of color. believe women. believe non binary people?’ And they’re like, ‘Yeah, okay, okay, I’m gonna do it, I’m gonna believe them.’

Ashia Ray
And you know, every time they meet an individual who says, something there’s that little voice in the back that has be be like “Or they might just not, you know, maybe it’s just that one person, and they’re just being outrageous, or they’re, they’re talking from a place of hurt, and therefore what they’re saying… they’re being hysterical.”

Ashia Ray
And again, we all have our internalized bias about seeing certain people as being hysterical. But I find that when I say “Believe us” – I mean, believe us on really small things.

Ashia Ray
When I said, ‘What does support look like for you,’ and you’re like, ‘sharing and word of mouth, I’m going to give you shit for free. I just want you to share it with a friend,’ right? ‘That’s all I ask.’

Ashia Ray
And how many people are actually doing that? Right? How many people are taking a link that you send them, putting it like.. daring! Copying the URL, go into their social media accounts (you know, they’re on social media) sharing it, putting it into their little thing, having the post load and be like, “This is a really good resource. A great way to support this person, if you enjoyed it, is to just go to their website.”

Ashia Ray
Not asking for money. You’re not asking for like, thousands of dollars of donations, but those little asks. Because we always start – yeah, we always start small, because we’re used to people shutting the doors in our faces when we ask.

Ashia Ray
So like, I don’t ask for things. And when I do, it’s because I’m desperate. So when I’m like, like, “Can you please give me feedback on what I’m doing? So I know how to make it better for you?” And then like, sure, I benefit from that, because you’re more likely to share it, you’re more likely to pay for it. But I’m like, “Could you just give me feedback? Could you just answer like two or three questions about what worked and what didn’t? And how I can make it more accessible?”

Ashia Ray
And people like “Oh, yeah yeah, okay.” (But then don’t.) And it almost seems like unless they can do something that they can show off to their friends as like…and benefit, hey, guys, if you share stuff like Revolutionary Hyumans, it’s showing off to your friends! You get to look good!

Ashia Ray
But like I’m asking for such small things that they don’t even see it as an ask. But this is what I mean by like, believe us. This is what support looks like, right? When you’re in a relationship and you’re like, I just really need you like put the toilet seat down – that’s it. And then they they go out and they like love bomb you with like flowers and dinner out. You’re like, I just wanted…

Bellamy
Just. Just wanted the toilet seat down.

Ashia Ray
[laughter] Believe me, we need to just start small. So I would really challenge anyone listening – just like – can you please just start a really small ask that it’s so small, it doesn’t even hit your radar? And especially for Asian people where like, if it’s cold, we don’t say “I’m cold. Could you turn up the thermostat?” We say “Are YOU cold? I need you to connect the dots because I don’t feel comfortable asking [with this power discrepancy between us.]

Ashia Ray
Bellamy’s dealing with some kids right now. [laugher]

Bellamy
Sorry. Got two doors between us… Yeah.

Ashia Ray
Yeah. So that is my pent up… so that discussion is – What DO we do moving forward? Because if we invest our time and energy into one thing, what’s going to happen if it fails? Alright, so that’s my rant.

Bellamy
I’m sorry. I’m so sorry. He’s, he’s running back and forth. And now like, I can’t tell if he’s coming back, but I’ll try to turn him out again.

Ashia Ray
[laughter] Yeah, the premise behind this podcast is, it’s just gonna have to be shitty and you’re gonna have to deal with it.

Bellamy
[laughter] It is what it is.

Ashia Ray
I have a lot of sounds going on and episodes with cats rubbing their anuses against a microphone and…

Bellamy
At any moment, my neighbor could turn on their rap and/or heavy metal. You can hear it you can hear bass from this closet. [laughter] Yeah. It’s great.

Ashia Ray
I think that covers some good things. To wrap it around back into that concept of spring emergence. And from revolutionary humans their topic this month is collaborative growth. For me, collaborative growth looks like labeling what things, what parts of our give and take are untenable to regenerative. There’s a lot of stuff that I do, and I love giving it away for free and I love doing it. But I do need – even though I like doing it, I still need some support to keep doing it. Right?

Ashia Ray
So for revolutionary humans right now, that looks like sharing, right? If you find something – and not just sharing random stuff – like if you do a thing, or if you find an essay – just share it. I know most people don’t have like, three month content calendars planned out, like I do. So I imagine it’s not even that hard. Or just – talk about the revolutionary humans resources at the PTO meeting, or while you’re waiting for the school bus, or with your homeschool group.

Ashia Ray
And for me, it’s just listen. Do the thing. Just start reading the books or… I always make at least one tiny call to action with the assumption that if there’s three calls to action, it’s going to be the smallest one that gets done. And it’s really as easy as clicking a link. Watching a video to see if it’s appropriate for your kids. Requesting a book from the library.

Ashia Ray
Both Bellamy and I have executive functioning disorders and we know that planning things out seems like “Oh if I get a book, then I’m going to have to this, and then pick it up, and then… and then sit down, and find a time to read it…”

Ashia Ray
So what we’re asking don’t make this more complicated than it is. Put the link into your social media box…

Bellamy
[laughter]

Ashia Ray
Click the link and request the book from your library. Like this does not have to be complicated. This is what we mean by ‘believe people.’

Bellamy
[laughter] totally.

Ashia Ray
Okay and hopefully – Yeah, I feel like that sufficiently, in non-non-threatening way encompasses my rage. [laughter] You know, there’s that that iceberg of rage underneath it all

Bellamy
[laughter] Right.

Ashia Ray
But I hit my bingo chart for what I need to cover in March for anger. Do you have anything to add about your topics this month about cooperative growth or spring emergence where it’s like – we need to be a little awkward. Imagine like a horse being born, you know, like how they walk?

Bellamy
[laughter]

Ashia Ray
Which is like the way my nine-year-old walks. Like there’s too many joints?

Bellamy
[Laughter] So many joints. Yeah, I truly wish I had something brilliant to add. I don’t. I’m gonna keep working on myself and trying to be my most authentic self and I hope everyone else does the same. And maybe that means not sharing just for attention, but sharing because you really believe in something.

Ashia Ray
Yeah.Okay so call to action for this this episode are… go to RevolutionaryHumans.com. Just that. Just that. Right? Just go there.

Bellamy
[laughter] Just go. Just go. Look around.

Ashia Ray
And if you like what you see, you’re free to come up with your own ideas on how to support by sharing, or liking, or subscribing.

Ashia Ray
And then for me – I’m actually remaking RaisingLuminaries.com now. It redirects to Books for Littles – our old website. And I’m working from that website. So DON’T go to RaisingLuminaries.com [laughter]

Bellamy
[laughter] DO go to RevolutionaryHumans.com Don’t go RaisingLuminaries.com

Ashia Ray
[laughter] I don’t want you to see me naked, I just…

Bellamy
[laughter]

Ashia Ray
April, I might have my shit together

Bellamy
Don’t go YET.

Ashia Ray
It’s – I just got the hosting up. So it says ‘hello world’ on it. So don’t…you know people are gonna go now!

Bellamy
People are gonna go.

Ashia Ray
They wanna see how embarrassing… ugh.

Bellamy
They’re gonna want to know.

Ashia Ray
Yeah, it will say – I have never if there’s someone who has – like when Jennifer Lawrence had some pictures shared against her will. I did not look at them. I really wanted to, but I didn’t.

Bellamy
Right. Nope.

Ashia Ray
No, I’m asking you people [laughter] This is not – I’m not equating what happened to her with my website. But like I’m just saying like we can we can control ourselves, people.

Bellamy
We can. We can just wait until the appropriate time. Wait until an invitation is extended.

Ashia Ray
Yeah. Okay. But I’ll let everyone know. Okay. So usually throughout the season, post once a week and I would love it if – if you guys have any more questions for Bellamy, feel free to go in the Anchor app and ask me. Or comment on the podcast episode, which all of the podcasts currently are living on BooksForLittles.com/podcasts.

Ashia Ray
So feel free to find the episode, ask a question. If you’re a Patreon, make a post or follow us or whatever. And Bellamy also has, I think a contact form or – there’s ways to contact her on her website. But if you have questions for the next time she’s on the podcast, then let us know.

Ashia Ray
I mean once we get over all this anger and confusion we’re actually quite funny.

Bellamy
[laughter]

Ashia Ray
Wouldn’t it be nice if we had space to actually have fun and joy and be hilarious as opposed to talking about the last person murdered? Right? How we prevent it? Like give us some space, man! Like yeah, come on.

Bellamy
We need joy.

Ashia Ray
We need joy. Okay, wrapping this up. Thank you so much, everybody. Bye bye.

Bellamy
Bye!

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Igniting the next generation of kind & courageous leaders